#HackingFinance [w/ anthemis | group]

welcome to the sixth paradigm

—   (via stoweboyd)

While change can certainly bubble up in an organization, more often it is senior executives who must champion and model what it means to think and act differently. And that requires different leadership behaviors. Behaviors that often feel like the opposite of what made the leaders successful. Trying these three behaviors just might produce unexpectedly good results:

Think like a venture capitalist, not a manager. Venture capitalists invest in people that have identified a problem and created a solution that people are willing to pay for. Sure they look at the financials but they don’t make their decisions based on them because it’s impossible to measure something that doesn’t exist.

Act like a problem solver, not the devil’s advocate. Devil’s advocates look for excuses to say no, while problem solvers recognize that all early plans have weaknesses, and seek to collaborate to find ways to overcome challenges.

Celebrate failure, don’t avoid it. Managers fear failure, while innovators recognize that failure is often a necessary step to success because it helps the learning process.

Fidor Bank FTW!

(Source: youtube.com)

Orderly Processions are Over

simonterry:

Hierarchy likes order. Networks manage complexity.
Hierarchy walks in an orderly procession. Networks hustle.
Hierarchy wants projects to go from a through to z. Networks experiment across the alphabet.
Hierarchy wants a clean status. Networks solve for problems & mess.

“But that’s OK, because in cryptoland, ceci n’est pas un dollar…”

“Lots of meetings, lots of PowerPoint slides, lots of committees, decision-making slowed down.”

“The problem is few retirees have the inclination to constantly rebalance their portfolios.”

—   

Leverage Your Way To A Richer Retirement

…except those that have discovered @Betterment and @Blueleaf…

Since early 2010 Fitbit has sold software to thousands of companies that want to monitor employees as part of preventive health and corporate wellness programs. On average 20% of workers join corporate wellness programs; more sign up when Fitbit is involved, says Amy McDonough, who helps run the programs.

Oil giant BP gave free Fitbits to employees who agreed to walk 1 million steps in 2013. More than 23,000 employees enrolled, and nearly three-quarters achieved that goal, winning them 500 “wellness points.” Getting 1,000 points in a year made them eligible for BP’s premium HealthPlus Plan, which was half the price of the standard health plan.

“The dirty secret of the business is that once you’ve accumulated assets above a critical mass, even as little as $1 billion under management, it’s pretty hard to screw things up.”

theeconomist:

Workers of the world, log in: LinkedIn has already shaken up the way professionals are hired. Its ambitions go far beyond that

Enabling new business models (like Anthemis Talent)…

theeconomist:

Workers of the world, log in: LinkedIn has already shaken up the way professionals are hired. Its ambitions go far beyond that

Enabling new business models (like Anthemis Talent)…